Reflecting on 15 weeks of camaraderie and code

Photo by Garrhet Sampson on Unsplash

About a month ago, I completed Flatiron School’s immersive software engineering bootcamp. Since COVID restrictions were still in place, all of it took place remotely over Zoom. I did my best to prepare myself for what I was getting into, the shock of returning to a school environment after over a dozen years, and also living a while without income. But there were bound to be things I didn’t know to prepare for, and if you’re anything like me, I hope this post will serve you well!

How do you know you’re…


How JavaScript Imitates Concurrency and Makes Promises

several traffic lights hanging on a wire giving mixed signals
several traffic lights hanging on a wire giving mixed signals
Where do all of these functions go anyway?

Around mid-bootcamp, we were introduced to fetch(), our first asynchronous method. I knew it involved something called a Promise, a chain ofthen() , which dealt with the return of promises, and it was all for the sake of allowing other JavaScript code to run in case the network request took a while. Without this feature, the stack could become “blocked” waiting for a longer process to complete and the user would be unable to interact with the website in the meantime. At the time, learning that general pattern to grab JSON data from…


Considerations for even the newest coders in HTML

Dog sitting in front of computer monitors, turned to look at the camera
Dog sitting in front of computer monitors, turned to look at the camera
Photo by Pavel Herceg on Unsplash

The web is for everybody. (And maybe some smart pets?) The UN has even decreed that the internet is a human right. If you are reading this article, you most likely use the internet on a daily, if not hourly or continuous basis. There is very little that cannot be enhanced or improved in some way through the help of the internet. Perhaps it’s comparison shopping, or looking up the weather before an outdoor trip, or finding a job or apartment. …


A short JavaScript primer for the overwhelmed front-end newbie.

illustrated drawing of a person with their head in their hands in front of a laptop
illustrated drawing of a person with their head in their hands in front of a laptop
Image by Hatice from Pixabay

The structure of my Bootcamp had us learning a back-end in Ruby on Rails first, and then we popped right into JavaScript. With Ruby, we had months of legwork in the basics, and with JavaScript, it was oh, about a weekend, followed by a firehose of a week.

We jumped into applying JavaScript to DOM manipulation pretty quickly too, while my brain was still adjusting to the finer points of for vs for…in vs for…of vs forEach (Real quick, in the same order: creates a loop, creates a loop through object…


Untangling the polymorphic association, and a teeny tiny bit about Active Storage

Photo by Federico Beccari on Unsplash

One of the beautiful things about the Rails framework is the built-in relationships given to us by Active Record. Active Record is a gem that provides Rails’ Object-Relational-Mapping (ORM) functionality. This allows our different models to talk to each other via their relationships by setting them up with the appropriate foreign keys and adding associations like belongs_to and has_many in their class definitions. …


How “params” is generated, used, and is stronger than a plain hash

Image by Arek Socha from Pixabay

So you’ve gotten started with Ruby and you’re ready to bring your code to life with Rails! You’ve gotten the basics of a Model-View-Controller (MVC) design down, your RESTful routes are set, and the server’s up and running. The index view was a breeze, but now you’re trying to render a view of a single instance of your model and you recall the standard syntax for that route (for a cat, because, why not):

get ‘cats/:id’, to: ‘cats#show’, as: ‘cat’

Huh, where’s that :id coming from and where…

Diana Liao

Software Developer with social justice roots. I love cats, Star Trek, and singing to inspire the downtrodden.

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